Gate-town Ideas

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Jem
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Gate-town Ideas

The gate-towns are sometimes just places to pass through on the players' way to their destination planes, but sometimes they're interesting places to be in their own right. I had a game once where we spent some time in Rigus due to a character's Mercykiller affiliation.

This isn't entirely a Renovation thread -- although you're welcome to make wholesale changes if you like! It's just a place to collect ideas for observations about the gate-towns, or things to do there, or changes you'd make, etc. I'll start off with a few ideas.

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The Great Wheel cosmology is understood to be a metaphor, since after all planes are in no spatial orientation to one another. But in a very physical sense, it's not! For some reason, whatever forces shaped the Outlands decided that the major gates to the other Outer Planes are arranged at roughly equal intervals, all in a rough circle, organized along the two alignment axes.

Now, it makes sense that they're all in a ring a long way from the Spire. The Spire would repel strong alignment influences, and if the gates were any further away they'd fall into the Hinterlands. But why is every plane on the opposite side of the Spire from its alignment opposite? Is there some kind of repulsive spiritual pressure? Does the Great Modron March keep everything from shifting around too much? Did gods arrange this by general agreement, so that opposing celestial factions would find it inconvenient to march on their enemies? After all, if Rigus were a day's march from the gate-town to Arborea the Powers of the Elves and the Orcs would likely be seeing constant combat over the intervening space!

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It's less remarked, but some planes have multiple portals to the Outlands. Carceri, for instance, has portals off-plane, often to the Outlands, every five orbs on the uppermost layer. Ironically, the imprisoned inhabitants can't use them -- only planar travellers -- and since the inhabitants hate this, they're one of the biggest hindrances to people getting off, surrounding the portals on the Carceri side.

A gate-town administrator who wanted to prevent their town's ideological slide might find it very convenient to order the migration of the gate-town from one strong portal to another every now and then, freshening the place up and reaffirming its presence on the Outlands. Naturally this comes with a lot of grumbling, lost travellers, people on the other side who don't want to lose business, etc. Plenty of opportunity to raise some tensions and make a quick buck.

Palomides
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Rehashing the Past

While it wasn't a true "renovation" we did have an old thread that came up with many ideas for the Outlands that I found useful to incorporate in my campaign
/forum/wild-west-planes

The overall gist was to re-imagine the Outlands [which are officially somewhat bland] with themes of the Wild West. The gatetowns were like the remote frontier towns controlled by a lawman.
On the lawful side, the themes were more like the Westerns of the '50's (like the Lone Ranger, etc.) where the lawmen wear white hats and keep the town from sliding into chaos from hostile forces
On the chaotic side, the themes were more like the Westerns of the '70's (like Clint Eastwood films) where the forces of law were seen as oppressive to the freedoms of the settlers who moved West to forge their own way

I also incorporated the Rilmani as a substitute for the Native Americans and I used a type of smoke powder that (inversely to magical power) was more volatile as one moved towards the Spire (so in the gatetowns it was a harmless incense, in the mid-range it acted as gunpowder for bullets, and near the Spire it was like nitroglycine) so that I could introduce firearms in the Outlands without allowing them elsewhere in my campaign

Not all of this will appeal to everyone, but I think the Outlands need something to give it some flavor and I liked this spin. (Also, a lot of people thought of a cowboy wandering the Outlands with the Spire in the background to conjure up images of King's "Dark Tower" series that they liked)

Palomides
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Last Side Point

While I will return to the theme of new/additional gatetowns, I want to add one last tangent in case it inspires anyone

I don't remember how many of these I stole and how many I came up with on my own but here are some of the sites I've included in the Outlands [my sincerest apologize if I am using anyone's idea without giving credit]:

-Absolution: a village where everyone can find forgiveness, for a price
-Antekh: a once-great city known mostly in ruins whose people held the secret to balancing the planes and supposedly holding the secrets by which Osiris was able to rise from the dead. The city was ravaged by a demonic invasion and the secrets of godly resurrection may have been lost (although rumors persist to the contrary).
-Bram’s Folly: an earth gensai’s attempt at building a planar resort
-Burning Horizon: a place that was, or rather will be, an ancient city of traders that does not yet exist. Travelling as it does backward through time, it appears only as ancient ruins from the future, filled with reflections of its future inhabitants
-Duality: a village where people split into two: a good and evil half. (The evil one often has a goatee beard)
-The Fugue Plain: this barren stretch of land is said to be the neutral meeting ground for gods or at least their agents when a debate or council needs to be held. The Riminili are extremely defensive against mortal trespassers
-Innocence: a village of only children. It is uncertain where adults went or how children are cared for
-Mauntylgrun: a dwarven city that once lied on the plane of Arcadia before it slid into the Outlands. Later, the city was devastated by an invading army. The city then lay in ruin for centuries. It is now being picked over by various scavengers from the planes
-Palpatur: a site near Pandemonium’s gate town, Bedlam, where an enormous stone humanoid head and hands reach out of the ground with what appears to be a scream of anguish. Is this the result of an incomplete summoning during a major war? A buried petrified titan? One group maintains them in the belief that they will one day revive and the beings will reward those who cared for them.
-The Restless Mausoleum: a gigantic stone golem wanders the Outlands, upon its back is an elaborate dungeon/mausoleum that houses the corpse of the wizard that presumably constructed it. None know who is interred within or why the golem endlessly wanders. (In reality, the golem was instructed to take the body to what was then the gatetown of Mechanus, but the city shifted over to that plane before the mission could be completed. Thus, the golem wanders endlessly looking for a city that no longer exists on this plane)

Palomides
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Potential Gatetowns

While I made up at least a third of these just today, I apologize if I'm using someone else's ideas without giving credit.

Potential new Outland towns:
**Ebbstream
This seemingly innocuous settlement appears to be a humble port town of small size. But the amphibian race that occupies it has actually placed the majority (90%) of their city under surface of the water. While they are reluctant to speak of their past, the natives seem extremely penitent for some unspecified sin from their cultural past and they respect visitors who display a similar level of humility and piety to the gods. If one can befriend the residents, the visitor may be guided to an underwater portal that leads to the wondrous, legendary city of Atlantis (which may be native to or have been transplanted to) the plane of Arcadia
[Side note: it there a major sea or lake in the Outlands on which to place this town?]

**Figment
No one is entirely sure of the exact location or form of this portal to the realm of Fraz-Urb'luu the Prince of Deception. The reason why is because the area is plagued by various shifting (and often deadly) illusions. The name Figment applies both to the tent-village of a nomadic group and to the chaotic area within a border this tribe patrols. If one can find the nomads and purchase the services of a guide, one will be led to the portal to the Abyss

**Fugue
A settlement that could be better defined as a well stockade fortress where entrance and egress is tightly controlled by the ruling council.
In the center of this settlement lies a giant metal sculpture of unknown origin with various moving parts twist and swing by each other in an elaborate choreographed movement that seems chaotic to visitors. Knowledgeable residents understand the precise (albeit complex) movements and for a fee can guide visitors to a gap in the structural supports that acts as a gate to the Mines of Marsellin on Thuldanin, the Great Scrap Heap of Acheron.

**The Halls of Absolute Serenity
The small, remote mountain monastery of Shangra-la teaches the Eastern principles of focusing and control to achieve the greatest spiritual good. If one can prove one’s worth to the temple master, one may pass through the torii portal that leads to directly to the fourth layer/level of Mt. Celestia

**H'thal-ki
This fortified town is a githyanki outpost relatively near the Spire that serves as a gatetown to the Astral. It is seldom visited by most planar races due to its inconvenient location and due to the hostility of the githyanki

**Kallisti
This town is located in a wild orchard said to have been sown from the seed of Discordia’s golden apple (the item that initiated the Trojan War). It consists of a ramshackle series of lean-tos that change with every visit, and its residents are the most surly and argumentative people in the planes. The space between two tilted trees near this town leads to Pandemonium.

**Rectitude-in-Repose
Eons ago, a great power (some say the “Mother of All Tarsques”, some say the botanical titan that spawned the treant races) died and its body was left to decompose in the Outlands. Upon this decaying form, one can find endless fungi forests including this secret settlement tended by a circle of powerful druids. Within this site, one can find two giant mushrooms leaning against each other to create a portal underneath that leads to Mycelia, the myconid philosophical paradise of Mechanus. While not a major trade route (as neither the druids in the Outlands nor the myconid-kings in Mechanus want undue numbers of visitors), the few that know of this site (and can overcome the stench of decay in the area) are able to gather extremely valuable spores and fungi in the limited amounts that the residents on both sides of the portal will allow

**Rhapsody
A town of artists and free-spirits living in stone structures in the Grecian style. A large open temple in the town leads to a corresponding abandoned temple near the domains of the Olympian gods. The town is ruled by seven archetypal bodiless spirits that possess mortals (willing good candidates or unruly evil candidates) for the period of a year. The town is famous for its fine wines

**Thanst
Often called “Taint”, this diseased berg is famous for its manufacturing and its filth. A portal in a polluted garbage dump leads to Gehenna. Despite its unappealing nature of its gate, the head Merkant in town has complete control over this gate and garners quite a bit from all the trade that pays to pass through it.

**Thebestys
Scholars say that this site was once a “typical” gatetown until a sense of hopelessness infected the populace who then converted it into the dreary necropolis it is today. No one currently lives in this a seldom-visited monument to the dead, and the few that do try to occupy the site (to exploit travel through the gate), are either repulsed and leave or they succumb to the same malaise that took the original inhabitants. A trapdoor in a buried pyramid leads to the entrance to Hades’ realm in the Grey Wastes. Good luck getting past the guardian
[Side Note: perhaps the initial wave of hopelessness dates back to the time when Osiris was murdered but before he had been resurrected by his wife Isis]

**The Village
This spot seems to be fairly idyllic resembling a sea-side resort with various decorative bungalows. But this pleasantry is deceiving. The entire location is controlled by a mysterious entity known as “Number One” (whom no one except possibly “his” executive officer, “Number Two”, has ever seen).
The residents are captive in the Village and all seem to be spies or individuals aware of secrets that could prove dangerous to various governments if ever revealed. All residents were abducted and placed here then assigned a number that is used to identify them instead of a name (in fact, some long-time residents can’t recall what their original name was). Those in power seem intent on destroying any sense of individuality or independence in the residents and various unique magical forces are in play to sow distrust amongst the residents and to break the captive residents’ spirits.
[Side Note: to those who have seen the show, this is obviously from the classic sci-fi television series, “The Prisoner”. And if you haven’t seen it, check out the first episode just to get the sense of manipulative paranoia and weirdness that made it memorable. Maybe not a great idea of a portal location as a major theme was the futility of trying to escape the Village but it does seem to capture the themes of distrust and capture native to Carceri]

**Wildmoor
The dense forest and boggy moor is famous for its wild game and for its savage hunters. Visitors have described it as a more brutal reflection of the Beastlands that embodies the “law of the jungle” and more ruthless “tooth and claw” attitude. A hollow redwood tree within Wildmoor serves as the portal to the perpetual twilight realm of Brux on the Beastlands

**Town with an Egyptian name meaning “Bounty from the flood”
This Egyptian-styled metropolis lies downstream from a might river formed from the runoff coming from the mountains regions surrounding Excelsior (i.e. the LG area of the Outlands “adjacent” to Mt. Celestia). It is a center of culture and learning hosting one of the most prestigious libraries in the multiverse. The name of the city is derived from the abundance of fertile silt that is deposited once each year when the river floods. The city is ruled nominally by a pharaoh but in practicality, it is controlled by the head priest of the city. Within a central structure controlled by the clergy is a massive portal leading to Heliopolis, the realm of the Egyptian gods on Arcadia

Jem
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Those are neat! I like to

Those are neat! I like to digest things so I'll have more thorough comments periodically for a while, but I can speak to this question regarding Ebbstream:

[Side note: it there a major sea or lake in the Outlands on which to place this town?]

Yes! The large lake Tir fo Thuinn was once a piece of Tir Na Og, shared by the Celtic Powers, but is now a realm of its own, ruled singly by Manannan Mac Lir, the Celtic god of the sea. Choose your source material, for it's referred to as both "at the base of the spire" and "ringward of the sixth ring" according to A Player's Primer to the Outlands. Mac Lir's realm is of course beneath the surface.

Another choice is the River Ma'at, which is not too deep, but is wide and slow-flowing, along the seventh ring from near Torch (gate-town to Gehenna) to near Excelsior (gate-town to Arcadia).

Atlantis is an interesting fantastic locale for a D&D game. Naturally it will have connections to the Greek powers, since the city was sunk for some offense against Poseidon. Having that offense kick the city out of Arcadia and into the Outlands (or the Prime! (or the Plane of Water!)) would certainly fit that legend nicely. Did you ever build it up much?

By the way, Thebestys is canonically the name of another town in A Player's Primer. It's a city of a few thousand people near the River Ma'at, where Thoth's Library is found.

Palomides
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Sorry, I didn't build up any

Sorry, I didn't build up any Atlantis ideas because I only came up with the idea yesterday when brainstorming concepts. But I agree that it seems like it would be an interesting thing to integrate into a campaign (I also liked the idea of a major planar gate that didn't cater to your typical (in this case, air-breathing) adventurer.

Regarding Thebestys, I undoubtedly stole the name (although I do not remember doing so). That's one of the dangers of grabbing ideas from a multitude of sources (canon, other's suggestions, my own weird ideas) and then dumping them into a document without citing my sources.

Jem
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Oh, in that case that's great

Oh, in that case that's great, we should totally develop Atlantis here!

There aren't a lot of Greek powers on the lawful side of the Great Ring. I wonder what it was doing there. Since Plato used it in his allegory as a state that attacked Athens, perhaps it was associated with the older Minoan religion.

Sources for that are thin on the ground, so we'd have a fairly free hand; they seem to have had a principal goddess associated with bulls, snakes, and the labrys or double-headed axe. Wikipedia says one scholar suggests that the main goddess was Ariadne, who was demoted after contact with the Greeks. Originally she was the great Mistress of the Labyrinth.

So Atlantis might have been a city worshiping Ariadne as a goddess, a weaver and serpent deity, a guide to the twisting paths and choices of life; perhaps it was a deliberately mazelike city that the inhabitants nevertheless understood well, because in truth it was laid out to a complex but orderly pattern. Picture a city with somewhat Babylonian architectural style.

She might have been a powerful goddess in very old days, before the rise to modern power of the Greek pantheon. There was a rivalry, and their worship gradually replaced hers, leading to her decline from divine power. She might have particularly clashed with the chaotic neutral Poseidon, who also claimed the bull.

Historically, there is some (somewhat disputed) evidence that Minoans practiced human sacrifice. Perhaps this was a desperation move as Ariadne's power waned. If Atlantis was a city on Arcadia, this would hardly have been tolerated by the plane, and the growth of this practice might have been the reason for the city's exile to the Outlands and sinking under the waves of the largest body of water there, Tir fo Thuinn.

And the reason Ariadne appears in Greek myth? Perhaps, as her power waned and her worshipers adopted black practices, she surrendered to the Greeks. They stripped her of almost all her remaining divinity and accepted into their myths both her and her city Atlantis, but in much reduced form. Atlantis, for its offenses, became a city punished because of its opposition to Poseidon. The evil of human sacrifice was cut out of its heart, leaving it a shadow of its former glory, sunk underwater in the Outlands. The sin itself was cast in to the Abyss, where it took the form of Baphomet, who became the demon lord of the Endless Maze, creator of foul beasts craving human flesh, echoing with Ariadne's connections to bull, snake, and other animals. Ariadne herself, reduced to a quasi-deity, was wedded to Dionysus, to be thereafter a minor figure, now with a little-worshiped mythological role as a symbol of guides.

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Tangent

I don't have too much to add to all the interesting ideas you've posted - but I do have one thing.

Several years ago, I was fortunate enough to be able to visit several of the Greek Isles. One of the things I learned was that many of the cities on these islands built their streets with an intentional maze-like arrangement. The thinking was that the residents would learn how to navigate the twisting streets but when pirates or other invaders landed, they would get lost, turned around and led into indefensible dead ends. I thought I'd mention this since it could tie in well to why the people might embrace a maze goddess

I think I only tied Atlantis to Arcadia because I had embrace the Planar Renovation idea for Arcadia that re-pictured the plane as a place where various civilizations built their concepts for an "ideal" city. Before its destruction, Atlantis seemed to be portrayed as a city-state of immense progress so it seemed like a good fit to me. But I'm open to having it start and end at different locations (e.g. the Plane of Water seemed like good fit that I hadn't thought of)

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Where is the Sigil gate-town?

Where is the Sigil gate-town?

Here's a simple question. Sigil has plenty of portals to the various Outer Planes. But the existence of the gate-towns themselves suggests that there is a significant traffic from Sigil, to gate-towns, and thence to the planes they connect to. To the best of your knowledge, what is the most common portal from Sigil to the Outlands? You can't get there just by jumping off the side of the city. I don't think you can teleport out of the city either, even to the Outlands.

Flipping through In the Cage and the Planewalker's Handbook, I only found one mention of a portal directly from Sigil to the Outlands -- the Ditch, which apparently leads to (waterways near or in?) several Lower Planar gate-towns. The Foundry apparently uses it to transport material. But that's probably not how most sods get to the Outlands or how most trade comes through, is it?

Tradegate is said to be the center of planar trade -- I wonder if there's a Sigil portal there. But that's less fun, I think, than envisioning another town. Suppose that there's a fairly traffickable portal to the Outlands, which merchant caravans can use with some regularity. What kind of town do you think would grow up just outside the Sigil side?

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Gate-Town Portals

Jem asked:
"To the best of your knowledge, what is the most common portal from Sigil to the Outlands?"

The writer's initial intention with the gate-towns was to give low-level characters interesting places with planar flavor. I vaguely recall reading that every gate-town had a portal to Sigil, and further that their Sigil portals were a major factor in preventing the gate-towns from slipping into their respective outer planes.

If one such gate-town portal to Sigil was to be more well-known and trafficked than the others though, Tradegate's portal seems like the obvious answer.

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Digression

Another thing worth noting is that gatetowns are not exclusive to the outlands (as far as I recall). There could easily be a gate town in Pandemonium with a portal to the Abyss, or in Gehenna with a portal to the Gray Waste. Some of these towns might be major targets in the blood war.

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Hm, yes, that's very true.

Hm, yes, that's very true. In fact I could see a "Further Ring," consisting of the most common paths from a plane to its adjoining plane around the Ring, and the planar highways between them. It would no doubt rarely be the case that a plane would connect directly to one more than a single alignment shift away, as such planes are spiritually distant in a reified sense on the Outer Planes.

Come to think of it, I wonder if half of those paths on the Further Ring are the standard routes on the Great Modron March where they dip into the planes. I own the Great Modron March but I've never read it in detail. Kind of half hope someone will GM it for me some day. :^)

The ones on the Lower Planes are probably the major back-and-forth land fought over in the Blood War.

I also kind of wonder if the marraenoloths have a habit of sabotaging those portals! After all, it's better for them if they have a bigger monopoly on the Lower Planar traffic.

No doubt the Further Ring on the Upper Planes is much easier to travel, although I bet Bytopia makes you go a long way between the two. Even there though, it's probably a bit more of a pain than the Outlands side if you're going across some of them; Amoria will try to hold you, and the Beastlands could get you hunted. In general, the Outlands have much less worry about extreme alignment conditions.

Limbo couldn't have any permanent route, of course. I know Carceri has standardized portals to the Gray Waste and the Abyss; there might be one route which takes you out of your way on the other sides but only requires a trip across a single orb of Othrys, while a shorter trip on the Abyss or Waste side, nearer points of interest, might require several orb hops.

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Making Gate Towns Exciting

Part of the problem with the Gatetowns was always that they reflected but did not really engage with the plane with which they abutted, and almost never referenced the role that petitioners play. Remember that the Outlands are filled with neutral petitioners that are naturally going to be the side characters in the PC's gambits. Fortunately! fiction and movies give us a lot of fun tools to references to spice up the gatetowns.

Hopeless: Two of Brandon Sanderson's books could spice up Hopeless: Warbreaker and Elantris. (Incidentally: there has to be graffiti at the entrance to Hopeless that says "Abandon Hope All Ye Who Enter Here", but it's used very sarcastically).
First of all, eliminate the Gray Plague - that's for the Gray Wastes. Petitioners live in abject fear that they be subject to a form of the Gray Plague that renders them effectively immortal, but every pain they experience is everlasting. Headache, ringing ears, too bright lights, nicks and scratches, dagger wounds - all of them, for evermore - and a fierce hunger to consume. Most give in to the pain, begging for food by the side of the road and eventually scrabbling their way to the oil-black portal at Hopeless's center, and some give in to the hunger and attack strangers with berserker rage (when these ones go to the Waste, it's believed they clutch their most closely held pain so close that they become Hordelings near immediately). Others find a different path: the brave seek to flee Hopeless and are met by hordes of Guardian Daemons scribed into the very walls and gate of the burg; the strident find purpose that leads them to overcome their constant pains - but the pain is always there, lingering. The Knights of the Planes Militant and Guardinals frequently bring food to the petitioners as a humanitarian gesture, without realizing that they are only feeding the hunger and inciting the very savagery that breeds new Hordelings.
Viv is amongst the most intoxicating substances in the lower planes. Viv enhances the senses, brightens colors, makes sounds more harmonious and lies more evident, and increases necromantic potency: truly a wonder drug. Named (variously) for vim, vigor, vivaciousness, and vitality, drawing forth Vim from an individual effectively gives them the Gray Plague. Personalities dull, pallor goes gray, eyes lose their vibrancy, all drawn out as a liquid cloud of color exiting the mouth and eyes. The most destitute residents of Hopeless occasionally give up their Viv, most often to agents of the Night Hags, who run a Viv cartel. Less often, Kestrin Ulket of the Bone Tower occasionally shows up with bright red hair: evidence that one of his cons has been successful. It's believed a secretive group has adapted Athasian arcane secrets, enabling them to draw forth Viv from surrounding bloods.

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More Gate Town Ideas

Ribcage: much love for Brandon Sanderson's Misborn in this one. I read a lot of other fiction, but his worlds are full of character! This one is a full re-do.
A single city microcosm of the Nine Hells, Ribcage lofts above the surrounding Outlands in twenty-eight massive spires arcing inwards, it's society strictly stratified.
As the Gatetown to a Lawful Evil plane, Ribcage has a strictly stratified society, with the lowest members chattel slaves, then bonded craftsman, military personnel, and the nobles occupying the highest level. Oddly, devils occupy only a few (visible) roles in the City: guarding the outermost barriers to the City, as couriers for the nobles, and judging the damned at its innermost sanctum.
The Avernari are a series of battlements and encampments surrounding the City primarily occupied by Nupperibo under the direct order of Quentil Paraks and the noble houses. Unlike most Nupperibo of Baator, which are gray and pudgy, those of Ribcage are all bright blue in color and range in size, with the bodies of the largest members stretching and tearing outward through their loose skin. The smallest members use crude meat cleavers as short swords and the largest use brutal great swords that bludgeon as much as cut. Oddly, the Avernari are positioned as much to attack inward as to head off an invasion from the planes...
The Disian Highlands sit just inside the Avernari and occupy the "ribs" of ribcage. The nobles of Ribcage have built their manors within and puncturing the ribs: from within Ribcage, the lower castes can see twinkling lights from the nobles' ballrooms, libraries, balconies, and offices (not bedrooms, though: those are safely ensconced within the ribs). Here, the nobles vie for power and curry favor with the rabble of devil-kin on Avernus in the Nine Hells proper, proudly proclaiming their alliances and courtiership - which are conveniently forgotten when the tides of Avernus change.
The lower levels towards the gate are more mixed: The Minauri are the habitations of the beaten-down slaves of Ribcage, in stinking, humid, bog-ridden lowlands. The slaves frequent the Phlegethia, or pleasure and pain houses, and the Stygian Ale-houses, where they literally drink to forget (the booze being spiked with the waters of the Styx).
While slaves are in menial positions in the Disian Highlands, they are mostly employed in the lowest levels: the Maladesnes are inhabited by fallen noble houses and ruthlessly abuse their slaves; the Malebolge Quarries are the primary source for mined materials throughout the burg; and the Canian Ice Quarries are the ice houses for the noble houses throughout.
All roads, though, lead to the Mouth of Nessus, the Gate to the Nine Hells. Here, before the very gates of Hell themselves, the devils make a spectacle of the act of damning petitioners: their judges rank and dictate the location of each soul consigned to the gate.
While the nobles claim to be the controlling power of Ribcage, the Black Ministry enacts the will of the Dark Eight as it relates to the Blood War outside the Nine Hells. Above even them, though, are the Infernal Inquisitors: apostate priests seduced by Asmodeus, iron nails driven into their eyes as evidence of their allegiance to the Lord of Ruby Scepter, blessed with incredible powers and able to speak with the words of Asmodeus himself.
Petitioners and the commoners in Ribcage are acutely aware that they are one step above being the lemures continuously shepherded towards eternal damnation, but that doesn't stop them from yearning to be free in the Outlands. While charismatic rebellions have occurred, organization has always been lacking...
Little remarked upon (and, truthfully, generally hidden by the Dark Ministry) each previous iteration of the Nine Hells' gate town has fallen to Avernus in the same manner: a slave or commoner rebellion erupted with such strength that the nobles, in fear for their lives or livelihood, call in all their favors without realizing that their existence relied on the maintenance of their alliances, most of which are little more the elaborate pyramid schemes built from sequentially more Infernal patrons. Eventually, the rabbles of devilkin are summoned forth, leading to internecine warfare throughout. With the possibility of chaos claiming the burg, the Dark Ministry calls upon the forces of the Avernari to crush the rebellion, resulting in the burg being drawn through the gate. Every. Single. Time.