PS Inspiration Take II: Getting Back on the Infinite Staircase

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UnDungeon PAXWest Reveal

UnDungeon PAXWest Reveal Trailer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UePyAl8V9nw

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Godzilla: King of the

Godzilla: King of the Monsters - Official Trailer 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wVDtmouV9kM

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Richard Bober - illustrations for Wolfe's Book of the Long Sun

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Gorgeous!
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A Mortai from the Beastlands?


Photo: Jeff Pang
Photographed at Mt. Baker, northern Washington in August 2008

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Ah Mortai are one of my

Ah Mortai are one of my favorite "monsters" from Planescape!

=-=-=

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina | Official Trailer [HD] | Netflix

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybKUX6thF8Q

=-=-=

The Dragon Prince:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWEtCsi3Eo8

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Creaks Trailer:
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Fellowship of the Ring:

Fellowship of the Ring:

“Despair, or folly?" said Gandalf. 'It is not despair, for despair is only for those who see the end beyond all doubt. We do not. It is wisdom to recognize necessity, when all other courses have been weighed, though as folly it may appear to those who cling to false hope. Well, let folly be our cloak, a veil before the eyes of the Enemy! For he is very wise, and weighs all things to a nicety in the scales of his malice. But the only measure that he knows is desire, desire for power; and so he judges all hearts. Into his heart the thought will not enter that any will refuse it, that having the Ring we may seek to destroy it. If we seek this, we shall put him out of reckoning.'

"At least for a while," said Elrond. "The road must be trod, but it will be very hard. And neither strength nor wisdom will carry us far upon it. This quest may be attempted by the weak with as much hope as the strong. Yet such is oft the course of deeds that move the wheels of the world: small hands do them because they must, while the eyes of the great are elsewhere.” 

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[M]atter, which we can now

[M]atter, which we can now define only as that which satisfies the laws of physics, may be spirit insofar as... the spirit conforms to the mental operations of distinguishing and objectifying. We can explain causally... precisely to the degree to which spiritual reality can be objectified; in this objectified form it is called... matter.

[I]n the history of philosophy this identity has been variously expressed by asserting that the final reality is spiritual; what... we call matter is the mode in which this final reality is perceived by itself as alienated from itself.

--C.F. von Weizsäcker

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Celtic Myths and Legends

Celtic Myths and Legends Podcast:

http://celticmythspodcast.libsyn.com/

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The Wodlands 10 - More, the

The Wodlands 10 - More, the Maw.

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Cut off, Ruined, Black and Burnt.
The Anaesthetic fire is said to come from here, in ages past.
Hence the burning Goblin Ghosts - pay them no mind.
The City of Visible Grief - strange winds that blow from the Maw turn the visible invisible and the invisible visible.
People go there to turn invisible - stand in the visible wind and be transformed as it blasts away your corporeal self and sends you into another world.

The City of Visible Grief been blasted into almost-total invisibility by the wind rushing through it for eons.
As if it were made of glass.
Hurts the eye to be there.
Dust, leaves and marks, and graffiti made by generations have left their mark.
The city is highlighted like a wireframe model, marked by by textures, covered by tags.
In most cases there is enough to make out general stuff.
The Maw slowly draws the Invisible City into itself - spires like the glass teeth of a circular worm...

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Plato's unwritten doctrines

Plato's unwritten doctrines

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plato%27s_unwritten_doctrines

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The two fundamental 'ur-principles' that are thought to constitute the basis of Plato's unwritten doctrines are :

The One: the principle of unity that makes things definite and determinate
The Indefinite Dyad: the principle of 'indeterminacy' and 'unlimitedness' (Gk., ahóristos dyás)

Plato is said to have described the Indefinite Dyad as 'the Great and the Small' (Gk., to méga kai to mikrón).[25] This is the principle or source of more and less, of excess and deficiency, of ambiguity and indefiniteness, and of multiplicity. It does not imply unlimitedness in the sense of a spatial or quantitative infinity; instead, the indefiniteness consists in a lack of determinateness and therefore of fixed form. The Dyad is called 'indefinite' to distinguish it from definite two-ness, i.e., the number two, and to indicate that the Dyad stands above mathematics.[26]

The One and the Indefinite Dyad are the ultimate ground of everything because the realm of Plato's Forms and the totality of reality derive from their interaction. The whole manifold of sensory phenomena rests in the end on only two factors. Form issues from the One, which is the productive factor; the formless Indefinite Dyad serves as the substrate for the activity of the One. Without such a substrate, the One could produce nothing. All Being rests upon the action of the One upon the Indefinite Dyad. This action sets limits to the formless, gives it Form and particularity, and is therefore also the principle of individuation that brings separate entities into existence. A mixture of both principles underlies all Being.[27]

Depending upon which principle dominates in a thing, either order or disorder reigns. The more chaotic something is, the more strongly the presence of the Indefinite Dyad is at work.[28]

According to the Tübingen interpretation, the two opposing principles determine not only the ontology of Plato's system, but also its logic, ethics, epistemology, political philosophy, cosmology, and psychology.[29] In ontology the opposition of the two principles corresponds to the opposition between Being and Not-Being. The more the Indefinite Dyad influences a thing, the less it has of Being and the lower its ontological rank. In logic, the One supplies identity and equality, while the Indefinite Dyad supplies difference and inequality. In ethics, the One signifies Goodness (or virtue, aretḗ), while the Indefinite Dyad signifies Badness. In politics, the One gives to a populace that which makes it into a unified political entity and enables it to survive, while the Indefinite Dyad leads to faction, chaos, and dissolution. In cosmology, the One is evidenced by rest, persistence, and the eternality of the world, as well as the presence of life in the cosmos and the pre-determined activity of the Demiurge Plato mentions in his Timaeus. The Indefinite Dyad is in cosmology the principle of movement and change, and especially of impermanence and death. In epistemology, the One stands for philosophical knowledge that rests upon acquaintance with Plato's unchanging Forms, while the Indefinite Dyad stands for mere opinion that is dependent upon sensory impressions. In psychology or the theory of the soul, the One corresponds to Reason, and the Indefinite Dyad to the sphere of instinct and bodily affects.[30]

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Usual caveats:

Usual caveats:

"The robust polytheism of the ancient Greeks offered worship to a great variety of beings.  Among these were nymphs, female spirits who were associated with springs and other features of the natural landscape.[1]  Precisely nothing of classical monotheism’s definition of a god can be applied meaningfully to nymphs.  Each nymph was believed to be active in a relatively small area, and to have power only over limited aspects of the natural and human worlds.  Nymphs were believed to have powers and knowledge surpassing that of human beings, but nothing even remotely like omnipotence or omniscience was ever attributed to them, and they ranked relatively far down the diffuse hierarchy of ancient Greek divine powers.

Yet it is a matter of historical record that for some people, the worship of a particular nymph or a group of nymphs became the focus of a life’s religious devotion.  The cave of Vari in Attica was the hermitage of one such person, a man named Archedamos of Thera, who lived there around the turn of the fifth century BCE.  Inscriptions he carved into the stone walls of the cave explain that he was a devotee of the local nymphs, planting and tending a garden for them and improving the cave at their direction.  After his death, the cave became a place of more than local pilgrimage.  Another example of the type occurred around the same time in Thessaly, at the cave of Pharsalos, where the hermit’s name was Pantalkes; again, the object of his devotion was the local nymphs."

-- Greer, John Michael. A World Full of Gods: An Inquiry into Polytheism (Kindle Locations 244-249). ADF Publishing. Kindle Edition.

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Odd. Can you go into a

Odd. Can you go into a little more detail about these practices? What did the worshipers expect of their worship? Was it supposed to have some effect on their afterlife? Why did they do it -- were they impressed by the local nymphs somehow?

I've been curious for a while as to why someone would devote themselves to a relatively minor "god." Perhaps I should take a look at this book.

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Ah I'll let you know if he

Ah I'll let you know if he goes deeper into, I'm not that far into the work yet.

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Butcher's Block:
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Usual Caveats:

Usual Caveats:

Mark Twain And The World of Dreams

http://consciousnessunbound.blogspot.com/2018/10/mark-twain-and-world-of-dreams.html

Quote:
Mark Twain, for example, who wrote about his psychic experiences, was a dream aficionado. At age sixty-three, he wrote My Platonic Sweetheart, an account of a dream adventure lasting forty-four years. This consisted of having episodic encounters with an archetypal fifteen-year-old sweetheart, sometimes called Agnes. In the dream, Twain is always seventeen. They meet about once every two years in various exotic locales; her appearance may change but her instantly recognizable soul essence shines through.

The encounter is brief, a mere glimpse, but when their eyes meet there is mutual recognition. They gaze upon each other and melt into each other in perfect love.
In a short narrative, in part good surrealism, nicely mimicking the way events unfold in dream logic, Twain writes: “In the first moment I was five steps behind her; in the next one I was at her side—without either stepping or gliding; it merely happened; the transfer ignored space.”

Speaking of two encounters with his dream sweetheart in 1864, he remembers “the eager approach, then the instant disappearance, leaving the world empty and of no worth”. The feeling was intimate without passion, childlike but finer, more exquisite than in waking life. Twain tells of his encounter with Agnes in Athens, “not surprised to see her, but only glad”, and then he “climbed a grassy hill toward a palatial sort of mansion built of terra-cotta . . .” and goes on to describe in detail what he saw as “the richly tinted and veined onyx”, noting how it all remained so vivid in his memory for thirty years.

About the house in his dream, Twain wrote: “When I think of that house and its belongings, I recognize what a master in taste and drawing and color and arrangement is the dream artist who resides in us.” He could scarcely reproduce a likeness of common objects, he said; by contrast his dream-artist never failed to create compelling visions of reality.

“But my dream-artist can draw anything, and do it perfectly; he can paint with all the colors and all the shades, and do it with delicacy and truth; he can place before me vivid images of palaces, cities, hamlets, hovels, mountains, valleys, lakes, skies . . . and he can set before me people who are intensely alive.”

Now in the last two pages of this reminiscence, Mark Twain is either pulling our leg or announcing a philosophy like that of the two philosophers mentioned up front, Broad and Price. In their view, we are immersed in an extended dream world that periodically overflows the boundaries of rational sense life. Again, Twain: “In our dreams – I know it! – we do make the journeys we seem to make; we do see the things we seem to see; the people, the horses, the cats, the dogs, the birds . . .”. The pain he felt when his dream love died was intensely real, “preternaturally vivid.” Fortunately, however, she re-appeared, revived in a later dream.

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In the mental world, for

In the mental world, for instance, there is a domain of the physical mind which is related to physical things and keeps the memory of physical happenings upon earth. It is as though you were entering into innumerable vaults, one following another indefinitely, and these vaults are filled with small pigeon-holes, one above another, one above another, with tiny doors. Then if you want to know something and if you are conscious, you look, and you see something like a small point – a shining point; you find that this is what you wish to know and you have only to concentrate there and it opens; and when it opens, there is a sort of an unrolling of something like extremely subtle manuscripts, but if your concentration is sufficiently strong you begin to read as though from a book. And you have the whole story in all its details. There are thousands of these little holes, you know; when you go for a walk there, it is as though you were walking in infinity. And in this way you can find the exact facts about whatever you want to know. But I must tell you that what you find is never what has been reported in history – histories are always planned out; I have never come across a single “historical” fact which is like history. This is not to discourage you from learning history, but things are like that. Events have been quite different from the way in which they have been reported, and for a very simple reason: the human brain is not capable of recording things with exactitude; history is built upon memories and memories are always vague.

(Collected Works of the Mother, Vol 4, 15 Feb 1951

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Fruit in a blossom and petals

Fruit in a blossom and petals in a seed
Reeds in a riverbed, music in a reed
Stars in a firmament shining in the night
Sun in a galaxy and planet in its light
Bones in the rosy blood like land in a sea
Marrow in a skeleton and I in me
- Owen Barfield

.......

Light in the world, world in the mind
Mind in the heart, heart in the night
Pain in the day, strength in the pain
Light in the strength, world in the light
- Owen Barfield

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Usual caveats, poem by

Usual caveats, poem by Novalis:

‘Almighty Spirit, primary source of all essences, /
Zeus, Oromazd, Brahma, Jehova, /
You are before the first eon and /
after the last you are there again. /
You call light and shine from bare darkness, /
from wildest chaos-an Ellisium. /
You wink and see! — a temple becomes hell /
and a sun is enveloped by night. /
From your mouth spring life and benediction /
in this tree and in Sirius. /
And food you spread to myriads of orders /
of creatures, and joyful delight. /
A child calls its father for food, /
though being full for thousand days, /
since the father even though unasked /
has food and drinks always already bestowed’

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The amazing crafting of
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Usual Caveats, Henri Corbin

Usual Caveats, Henri Corbin On Spiritual Reality & Imagination

For all our esotericists, the interior world designates the spiritual reality of the supersensible universe which, while a spiritual reality, is that which encircles and envelopes the reality of the external world... 'To leave' that which we commonly call the exterior world is an experience not at all 'subjective' but as 'objective' as possible, but it is difficult to transmit this to a spirit wanting to be modern.
- En Islam Iranien v. 1, 82

The Active Imagination guides, anticipates, molds sensory perception; that is why it transmutes sensory data into symbols. The Burning Bush is only a brushwood fire if it is merely perceived by the sensory organs. In order that Moses may perceive the Burning Bush and hear the Voice calling him 'from the right side of the valley' - in short, in order that there may be a theophany - an organ of trans-sensory perception is needed.
- Creative Imagination in the Sufism of Ibn 'Arabi, 80

…The seriousness of the role of the Imagination is stressed by our [Iranian] philosophers when they state that it can be 'the Tree of Blessedness' or on the contrary 'the Accursed Tree' of which the Qur'an speaks… The imaginary can be innocuous, the imaginal never can.
- Spiritual Body & Celestial Earth, vii-x.

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Usual caveats, neither

Usual caveats, neither endorsing nor refuting any real world beliefs:

"The concept of this dimension of light, an archetypal dimension because it grounds every being in another self which keeps eternally ahead of him,can provide us with the key to a celestial world inhabited by figures who are constituted and governed in their being by a law of their own, a law with its very own logic. The responses we have just read refer to the twofold plane or twofold state of being which characterizes Mazdean ontology,and which is designated by the two terms menok and getik. We must take care not to reduce the contrast they express to a Platonic schema pure and simple. We are not dealing precisely with an opposition between idea and matter, or between the universal and the perceptible. Menok should, rather,be translated by a celestial, invisible, spiritual, but perfectly concrete state.Getik designates an earthly visible, material state, but of a matter which is in itself wholly luminous, a matter immaterial in relation to the matter that we actually know. For, and this is the peculiarly Mazdean conception,a transition to the state of getik means in itself not a fall but rather fulfillment and plenitude. The state of infirmity, of lesser being and darkness represented by the present condition of the material world, results not from its material condition as such but from the fact that it is the zone invaded by the demonic Contrary Powers, the arena of struggle and also the prize.

Here the stranger to this creation is not the God of Light but the Principle of Darkness. Redemption will bring the flowering of the 'tan i pasen', the"body to come," the corpus resurrection is; it does not tend to destroy the getik world, but to restore it to its luminous state, its archetypal dimension."
-Henri Corbin, Cyclical Time and Ismaili Gnosis

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We thought the Incas couldn’t
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GRIS Reveal Trailer ->
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What Were the Isles of the

What Were the Isles of the Imprisoned Moon?

http://falsemachine.blogspot.com/2018/12/what-were-isles-of-imprisoned-moon.html

Quote:
The Nightmare Sea itself was a black and lightless ocean beneath which slept somewhat lovecraftian entities. There were no stars, compasses didn't work very well, the 'heavens' of stone sometimes dropped so close to the surface that they could take the masts off ships. The only way to navigate was via 'ateks' biopatterns of regular sealife, and the Nightmares of the Sleeping Minds.

By examining the exact content of their nightmares, and working out which parts were driven my or inspired by the insidious psychic energy of which sleeping being, the Navigators could triangulate their position.

The Navigators come from Nox.

Nox was intended to be a kind of Rome/London/Dark Athens, insanity driven industrial hyperpower which came as close to ruling the Nightmare Sea as anyone.

Far away from Nox, on the other side of whatever the 'world' was down there, were the Isles of the Imprisoned Moon...

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